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Gemini Publication Inclusion Criteria

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Publications

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To qualify as a Gemini publication, a paper must employ in an original way an image, spectrum, or data set produced by Gemini to derive new scientific results. No attempt is made to fractionate papers per telescope used in the case of papers based on the use of other facilities as well. A top-level principle is that data (even if reduced) can be “counted” twice, but derived results normally cannot.

Counted:

New analysis of data (even if starting from someone else's photometry or a reduced spectrum). For example:

  • Using a photometric point in an SED (beyond the scope/wavelength coverage of the original paper) for additional analysis.
  • Monitoring orbits -- although astrometry was published before, the analysis is more than a reference. Astrometry in this sense is “reduced data”, not “results”.
  • Fitting a new model to a previously-published Gemini spectrum to derive (e.g.) age or metallicity.
  • Employing redshifts determined from a Gemini program publication as a key part of a new analysis to derive masses, distances, sizes, luminosities, peculiar velocities, etc.

Not counted:

Quoting previously-derived results, or using them unaltered in an analysis. For example:

  • quoting and using a SED slope derived in a previous publication. The slope is “derived results” not “data”,
  • quoting and using ages and metallicities taken directly from a previous publication. These are clearly “derived results”,
  • quoting an orbit derived from Gemini data in another publication. The Orbit is “derived results”, not “data”,
  • quoting redshifts previously derived from Gemini data in another publication.

Papers that:

  • describe instrumentation or software without new science results,
  • simply mention ongoing projects,
  • suggest future observations with Gemini telescopes,
  • develop models or run simulations, using data merely as examples.

Instrumentation and Software papers

Additionally, we track papers describing Gemini instrumentation and software publications separately. If a publication of either type also meets the data inclusion criteria above, it can be counted both ways.  To qualify as a Gemini software publication, the software must be demonstrated to work with Gemini data.